Dr. Mark Dean

Computer Inventions

Dr. Mark Dean

 

 

 

 

Mark Dean, Chief Technology Officer for IBM’s African and Middle Eastern divisions. A key member of the teams at IBM that first developed the personal computer, Dean holds three of IBM’s original nine patents. Among his accomplishments during his tenure as engineer at IBM is his leadership of the team responsible for the development of the Industry Standard Architecture bus. This technology was crucial in early personal computers in that it allowed the different peripheral devices such as printers and modems attached to a motherboard to communicate with one another. Not satisfied with his success and wanting to learn more about his field, Dean returned to school and earned his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford in 1992. After returning to IBM, Dean was awarded the company’s highest award, the title of IBM Fellow in both 1996 and 1997. He has also received the Black Engineer of the Year President’s Award and was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1997. In 1999, Dean made further advances in the field of microprocessors as part of the team, which developed and tested the first one-gigahertz microprocessor. In 2001 Dean was elected as a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Today, Dean’s patents and patents pending exceed 40, and he continues to set trends in the field of technology and computer innovation. As recently as last August, Dean, one of the original developers of the personal computer, stated in his personal blog that he now uses a tablet instead.

By Buster Bytes

Dr. Mark Dean, we salute you!